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A Loved One Has Been Diagnosed With Dementia – What Happens Next?

When somebody is told that they have dementia, it will trigger all sorts of thoughts and emotions. Responses can be a mix of shock, sadness, fear and sometimes even relief that there’s an explanation for some of the changes they have experienced.

The inevitable question is, ‘what next?’. Living with dementia changes your life, whether you are the person with the diagnosis, a loved one or a carer. There are practical issues to consider as well as those related to care and emotional wellbeing. A carer’s life can be stressful and challenging, so it’s best to be prepared.

DEMENTIA CARE OPTIONS DURING THE PANDEMIC

Wellbeing

Dementia inevitably changes close personal relationships. It helps to talk openly about what this will mean for everyone concerned. If your spouse or partner is diagnosed with dementia, it will mean a huge adjustment for both of you. Inevitably, your main concern will be for your partner but don’t forget that you will also be affected and that you need to look after your own physical and mental wellbeing.

You may be able to find training and local support groups to help you in your role as a caregiver. Support and online discussion groups – such as the Alzheimer’s Society Talking Point – are also available to help your loved one cope with the adjustment.

Above all, it will take time for your loved one to adjust to the diagnosis. You could suggest counselling, perhaps at a memory clinic, which can be a big help. Charities such as Age UK, Alzheimer’s Society and Dementia UK provide services that may also help. These include helplines, support groups, day centres, shopping services and home care.

A diagnosis brings an entitlement to a care and support needs assessment from your local council. You can arrange this by contacting social services or through your GP, consultant or other health service professional.

ACCESS MORE USEFUL RESOURCES

Carer’s Assessment

If you care for someone, you can have an assessment to see what help could make your life easier. The types of help you could get include:

  • Respite care so you can take a break
  • Training in how to lift safely
  • Help with housework and shopping
  • Access to local support groups

This is definitely the time to look after your health and that of your loved one – including regular exercise and a healthy balanced diet. If your loved one is feeling depressed after their diagnosis they may need plenty of encouragement and cajoling to take good care of themselves.

Practical Considerations

There are inevitably some practical issues to plan for. Here are the main things to consider:

  • Register as a carer with your GP.
  • Make sure that your loved one has an up-to-date will and has assigned lasting powers of attorney for when they are no longer able to make financial or healthcare decisions for themselves.
  • Claim any benefits that you are entitled to. These could include a Personal Independence Payment or Attendance Allowance. As a carer you may be eligible for a Carer’s Allowance.
  • Make sure that papers relating to your loved one’s bank accounts, mortgage or rental documents, insurance policies, tax and pension details, bills and guarantees are in order and easy to find.
  • Think about advance care planning so that your loved one’s wishes for their ongoing care are written down.

At some stage in the future, it’s likely that care support will be needed – either care at home or residential and nursing care. Contacting a care provider such as Altogether Care will help you understand the options available and how your loved one’s needs might change in the future.

For information on Dementia Care options, call 01305 206140 or email info@altogethercare.co.uk.

Care At Home, Coronavirus and the Future

A woman in 1971 would have expected to live to the age of around 77. For a man, life expectancy was a little over 71. By 2017, the life expectancy for women had risen to over 83 and for men it was just under 80.

The increase in life expectancy has been driven by better healthcare, a reduction in smoking, improved health and safety in workplaces, more plentiful and varied food and improved amenities. And as, on average, we are all getting a few more years post-retirement, it’s important to make the most of them.

Maintaining independence is an important feature of the quality of life for many people in their later years. Usually, this means that individuals will want to remain in their own homes wherever possible. In many cases, people living in the own homes during their later years are fully mentally capable and can, for the most part, take care of themselves. If, in your case, you’re not as mobile as you used to be, a few things may become a bit more difficult. But that’s no reason to give up your independence.

Care at home is increasingly popular because it gives people choice and flexibility. They agree with their care provider what type of help they need and how often. They have a care plan that is their care plan, not something that somebody decides for them. And most of all, they are in familiar surroundings in a community they know.

How Has Covid-19 Changed Things?

The pandemic increased the demand for care at home services. This is partly because care homes were sometimes unable to admit new residents and partly because some people recovering from the virus face a long process of recuperation. It was also harder in many cases for family members and informal caregivers to help out because of guidance about isolating and social distancing.

A great deal of the burden of coping with Covid-19 fell on the care sector and we’re proud of the way our team rose to the challenge. The value and benefits that care at home services deliver became much more obvious to the general population.

It was a difficult time but we pulled through. We’re now focused firmly on the future and how we can bring independence and quality of life to even more people in their later years.

Contact 01305 206 140 or email contact@altogethercare.co.uk for more information.

Could Live-In Care Be Right For You?

For many people, the first type of care they need is care at home. In a lot of cases it’s all they’ll ever need as they are able to carry on living independently with a bit of help.

In other cases, the amount of care and support a person needs increases. Eventually it reaches the point where once or twice daily visits from a carer are not enough. It’s then time to make a decision about the next step.

There are several signs that the type of care needs to be reviewed. These could include an increasing number of memory lapses and near misses such as cookers or electrical appliances being left on, or increasing frailty and finding daily living too much of a struggle.

The first thing that probably comes to mind is residential care; but it’s far from your only option. For some people who receive later-life care the overriding priority is to stay in their own home for as long as possible. That’s where friends, family social activities and memories are.

Live-in care makes it possible to continue living in your own home even when you have significant care needs. Often, it’s less of an upheaval than moving into a care home.

What Does Live-In Care Mean?

In simple terms, it means being able to stay in your home (a place you feel emotionally attached to) without being alone or having to fend for yourself. Your carer lives with you so they are always on hand to help you look after yourself, deliver personal or medical care and keep an eye out for your wellbeing and safety.

They can help you with domestic chores, shopping and trips out when you need them. But as well as the practical help you have companionship and security, and the peace of mind that you are not on your own. If you would like to know more about our live-in care service call us and arrange an appointment. We’ll be happy to talk you through your options and find the care service that works best for you.

Contact 01202 894 925 or email contact@altogethercare.co.uk for more information.

Flexibility in Care: Later Life Care is a Journey, Not an Event

People often talk about ‘going into care’ or ‘receiving care’ as though these are single events or destinations. The reality is that everyone’s care journey is unique. At different times, an individual might need more or less care, or different types of care.

Care is sometimes needed for a short period to help somebody recover from illness or an operation. Often, it’s a progressive journey where needs gradually change with increasing levels of dependency.

Nobody can really predict how an individual’s care needs are likely to evolve, or at what rate. As a care provider an important part of what we do is to continually assess the support that our clients need and to adjust their care plans to suit. In most cases a formal annual review of the care plan is enough but sometimes it needs to be more frequent or is triggered by an event such as illness.

Flexibility is essential so that we can achieve the right balance between care support, wellbeing and maintaining independence. A good quality of life is every bit as important as looking after personal and healthcare needs.

Anticipating Change

Part of the process is to anticipate changes, particularly where care needs are likely to increase over time. This relies on getting to know clients really well. We can then build trust by demonstrating to clients and their families that decisions are always made in their best interests and reflect their wishes.

This relationship is critical in making the care planning process work effectively, in a way that consistently meets clients’ needs.

One helpful consideration when choosing a care provider is to think about how needs may change over time. Because relationships are important, it can be useful to look at the range of services the provider offers should they be needed in future.

Altogether Care is able to respond to changes in the level of dependency over time. All staff are well trained to manage any increase in requirements, including moving and handling, care planning and dementia awareness.

Our services range from help with personal care in your own home, through to nursing care to assist with dementia, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy, strokes and much more. As needs change, we can support our clients through each stage of their care journey. They have the reassurance that they are always dealing with a team of people who understand them as individuals and can respond to whatever challenges arise.

To talk through our our services with a member of our team, contact us today on 01305 300161 or email contact@altogethercare.co.uk.

Maintaining Health and Wellbeing: Why Care at Home May Be the Best Option

There is sometimes an assumption that having significant care needs automatically means residential care. But that needn’t be the case. There are plenty of options for receiving the care you need in your own home. For many people, care at home can even help them stay healthier for longer.

Good health and mental wellbeing are closely linked. And sometimes wellbeing comes from familiar surroundings and familiar routines. This can be particularly important for people with dementia. Being independent also helps people to feel more active and engaged, which also helps to keep them healthier for longer.

Living on Your Own

If you have a spouse, partner or family member living with you, staying in your home is easier. But even if you find yourself living alone it doesn’t mean that residential care is your only choice.

According to the Alzheimer’s Society, people with dementia, ‘often feel happier if they can remain independent and in their own homes as long as possible.’ They list a few important factors for continuing to live contentedly in your own home:

  • Have a good support network of family, friends and care professionals.
  • Keep up with social activities and pastimes.
  • Make a point of calling people regularly and consider using a video calling service such as Skype.
  • Investigate local befriending groups.
  • Consider online forums and support groups if you don’t have friends or family you can talk to regularly.

The other important aspect of continuing to live a healthier and happier life in your own home is to find the right home care provider. Even if you need around the clock care to carry on living at home, it is possible to arrange this through a live-in care service. For many more people, it’s likely to be finding help with simpler tasks such as washing, dressing and housework.

Whatever the level of support you need, you should always be able to live at home if it’s where you feel happier and more independent. Talk to the team at Altogether Care and we’ll help you find the home care solution that works best for you. Contact 01305 206140 or email contact@altogethercare.co.uk for more information.

Caring for a Loved One: How to Lift & Handle Safely and Properly

Being a caregiver is a demanding task. It is likely to be a role that you never asked for and maybe one that you never expected to have. It can be thankless, and it can sometimes feel like you are on your own.

Fortunately, there is help and support available from organisations such as Carers UK where you can find advice, guidance and online forums so you can share experiences and learn from other people in a similar situation.

As a family-run and socially responsible care business, Altogether Care also likes to support unpaid caregivers where we can with advice and occasional training courses.

Moving and Handling

One of the trickiest aspects of caregiving can be when you need to help somebody with restricted movement. Moving and handling comes with the risk of personal injury if you don’t do it correctly. You must also keep the dignity and self-respect of the person being moved in mind. Safe moving and handling are important aspects of the training that all our care staff go through.

Free Training Course

To help, we are offering free training to caregivers on how to move people safely. You’ll be provided with a certificate upon completing the course. It will take on Wednesday 18th March at 2pm and Thursday 26th March at 2pm.

The courses will be held at 13 Carlton Road North, Weymouth, DT4 7PY.

Booking is essential to secure your place. Please email ellief@altogethercare.co.uk or call 07881 802196 to book.

We’ll also give you free tea, coffee and cake. As well as the training you’ll have the chance to meet and talk to other caregivers.

Top Tips

If you can’t make the training here are a few moving and handling tips that will help:

  • Take account of the weight of the person. If you don’t think you’re strong enough don’t attempt it on your own.
  • Always get somebody to help if you can.
  • Make sure there are no obstacles or ‘slip and trip’ hazards.
  • Never lift above shoulder height
  • Space your feet to give you a firm and stable base.
  • Have a firm hold and keep any weight close to your body
  • Lift from the knees keeping your back straight
  • Lift as smoothly as possible

Obviously, it’s better to be shown how to do this than read about it. So, if you can, please come along to our free training session. We look forward to seeing you.

For more information, please contact us on 01305 206140 or email contact@altogothercare.co.uk

Christmas at Sherborne House & Santa’s Little Helpers

Last week, the staff at Sherborne House put their Christmas suits on and dressed as Elves to raise money for individuals affected by Dementia.

Dementia affects over 850,000 people in the UK, which is set to increase to over one million by 2025. We take great pride in providing the best possible quality of care for some of those people affected, ensuring that their environment is comfortable and accommodating to their needs.

This Christmas, the staff at Sherborne House are raising money with a raffle to contribute to the residents’ fund. Read more about our Dementia Care here.

Sherborne House Christmas Stockings

Apetito – Food and Drink for People With Dementia

Apetito has been established since 1928; they employ their own in-house dietitian and registered nutritionist to create and ensure that all meals are not only delicious but that they also meet the nutritional standards required by the British Dietetic Association (BDA), the National Association of Care Catering and the Hospital Food Standards Panel. In 2016, Apetito won the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in Innovation for the second time for our texture-modified meals for people who have difficulty swallowing or chewing.

Altogether Care recognises that good nutrition and providing an enjoyable dining experience are central to promoting good health and well-being among our residents, values we hold dear at Sherborne House.

In September, Sherborne House held a food tasting afternoon delivered by Apetito. The afternoon was a resounding success with residents, family members and staff enjoying an array of mouth-watering dishes; with cleared plates all round.

Following on from this successful afternoon with everyone having the opportunity to fire questions fielded by a team of staff from Apetito; the question was asked whether Sherborne House should adopt Apetito? The decision by all was a resounding yes.

So, what does this mean for our residents?

We can now offer our residents a choice of over 200 delicious meals and desserts, so there’s something for everyone, with a wide range of meals tailored to every taste, dietary and cultural requirement.

For residents who have dementia, we acknowledge that the enjoyment of their meal starts with the eyes, with every mealtime a highly sensory experience, the visual aspect is essential.

We wanted to make a difference for all of our residents but  faced our biggest challenge was the presentation and taste of our texture modified meals for residents with swallowing difficulties. Typically, these meals were shapeless, somewhat tasteless, not to mention visually unpalatable. We are now delighted that the meals we now provide are visually appealing; with clean plates all around proving the success of the new recognisable shaped foods.

Most importantly, using Apetito means that all of our meals meet Care Quality Commission (CQC) and National Association of Care Catering (NACC) standards and are in line with the British Dietetic Association (BDA) guidelines. The meals carry the optimal nutritional value, all while catering for dietary requirements and conditions such as dysphagia.

One Thing You Should Always Look for When Choosing a Care Home

If you had to choose a care home, what would you look for? You might look at the quality of the accommodation, staff training, food or maybe even the CQC inspection report.

If your biggest concerns were maintaining emotional and physical wellbeing, good mental health and being less at risk of developing dementia you’d probably want to take a very close look at the activity programme.

There’s a growing body of evidence that staying physically and mentally active is vitally important in later life. The benefits of a full activity programme include better mobility, self-esteem, confidence, independence and companionship.

New research reported by Psychology Today suggests that maintaining high levels of social interaction may also make people more resilient when it comes to the risks of cognitive decline and developing dementia.

At the most basic level activities make life more fun. They are a way to make friends, learn new skills, see new places and interact with other people.

Activity programmes in care homes are not just a way of filling time and preventing residents from getting bored. They are also part of the care people receive because they make such a meaningful contribution to maintaining levels of health and wellbeing.

Our care homes have activity coordinators who carefully plan programmes that include art classes, live music, exercise, dance, gardening and crafts. There are also regular organised trips to nearby locations and events. We aim to provide something for everyone, whatever their level of ability, and many activities are organised in response to residents’ suggestions.

For many residents, being in care makes it easier to access activities so they can enjoy more social interaction, stimulation and enjoyment in their later years.

There are many factors to weigh up when choosing a care home, we’d suggest that the variety of activities on offer should be fairly near the top of the list. You can contact us here to find out more information.

A Society Learning to Live with Dementia

Until somebody develops effective treatments to prevent or control dementia it is going to be an increasing fact of life for many of us. Not just for the estimated one million plus people who are expected to develop the condition in the UK by 2025, but also the many more people who will be affected as family, friends and carers.

There’s little doubt that the general population would benefit by understanding more about dementia. This can only help take away some of the fear and stigma that unfortunately still surround the condition. It can also help us to build a society and environment that are more dementia friendly.

One thing people often get confused about is the difference between dementia and Alzheimer’s. Technically, dementia is a syndrome. That means a group of symptoms that don’t necessarily have the same cause. In the case of dementia, the symptoms relate to reduced ability in areas such as memory and reasoning. Different people experience dementia in different ways.

Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of dementia. It is believed to account for between 50 and 70 percent of cases. Although recent research suggests that many people thought to have Alzheimer’s may, in fact, have a newly discovered type of dementia-related illness called limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy, or Late.

Dementia can also result from other conditions such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s, and can be caused by strokes, vascular diseases, depression and chronic drug use.

Understanding Dementia

In many practical ways, the exact cause is less important than understanding how dementia can affect people’s ability to relate to the world and people around them, how it might affect their behaviour, and how best to make life for people with dementia more inclusive and less stressful. This can only come from greater knowledge and being more comfortable about discussing the issues that surround dementia.

Care homes that specialise in dementia care, such as Sherborne House in Dorset, will clearly have a greater role to play as the population ages and more people are affected. But we all have a part to play by being more understanding about a condition that a significant number of us will be affected by – directly or indirectly.

How to Spot the Early Signs & Symptoms of Dementia

By 2025, it is estimated that there will be more than 1m people in the UK with dementia. The quality of life of these people will depend to a large extent on how early they are diagnosed. Yet, very few of us are clear about what to look for.

According to the NHS website, possible early signs of dementia include:

  • memory loss
  • difficulty concentrating
  • difficulty with familiar daily tasks, such as confusion over the correct change when shopping
  • struggling to follow a conversation or find the right word
  • being confused about time and place
  • mood changes

Where one or more of these symptoms occur at a level that doesn’t significantly affect everyday life it is called minor cognitive impairment. Sometimes the symptoms don’t get significantly worse for a long time, but sometimes they are an early indicator of dementia.

Cognitive impairment isn’t (as many people believe) ‘all part of getting old.’ If symptoms are observed, it’s essential to get a proper diagnosis as quickly as possible.

Alzheimer’s

The largest cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s Disease. People in the early stages of Alzheimer’s may ask the same question repetitively, become confused in unfamiliar environments or become withdrawn or anxious.

In the longer term it’s possible that there will be a blood test that can quickly diagnose common causes of dementia. Early test results are encouraging and further research is underway.

As a family member or close friend, you are likely to be the first people to notice any signs for concern. It’s important to encourage the person to get a proper diagnosis as soon as possible.

While the facts can be hard to face, the reality may be less scary than the uncertainty. And it’s always better to know so that appropriate steps can be planned.

In the early stages, dementia symptoms can often be managed. But eventually it may be necessary to receive residential care at a home equipped to deliver dementia care such as Sherborne House in Yeovil.

Putting the Fun Back Into Food for People With Dementia

For people with dementia, maintaining a healthy and balanced diet can be difficult. People often feel less like eating for a number of reasons. Food might not taste the same as it used to, or sometimes it can be physically hard to eat because of pain or reduced motor skills and coordination. Depression is also common, meaning that meal times and food lose their appeal.

When communication becomes difficult, the only way to express the fact that food is too hot, too cold, hard to eat, or just doesn’t taste right may be to leave it. And not eating or eating the wrong things could make a condition worse. While there is no conclusive proof, there is a growing body of evidence to say that a healthy diet, low in salt and saturated fats, and high in antioxidants and Omega-3s can help slow the onset of dementia.

Dementia and Nutrition

There are many things that can be done to encourage people with dementia to eat and drink more and the Alzheimer’s Society has some excellent information on its website. We use many of these techniques at Sherborne House, which specialises in dementia care.

Overall, we aim to reconnect people with the enjoyment of food and eating. Partly this is through the design of the eating environment so that mealtimes are calm and as free of distractions as possible. We also encourage residents to engage with their food by preparing healthy sandwiches and fruit salads and by baking cakes. These are fun, social activities that help to associate food with positive emotions and thoughts, rather than being a source of anxiety or conflict.

The positive culture around eating not only stimulates appetites, it helps residents feel more confident and in control of their lives. Discussions about food can also stimulate reminiscence and maintain sensory abilities.

On the one hand eating and drinking can be a challenging aspect of dementia care, but they can also be therapeutic and encourage greater engagement with other people and enjoyment of life.

Why not come and see for yourself what life at Sherborne House is like? Contact us today on 01305 300 161 to arrange a visit.

Lack of Dementia Friendly Housing is a Major Issue in the UK

One feature of the UK’s housing crisis that rarely gets attention is the severe lack of dementia friendly housing. Compared with countries like Australia, France and the Netherlands we have a major lack of options for people with dementia once their condition makes their existing home unsuitable.

There are modifications that can be made to most homes that would make them more suitable for a person with dementia. Age UK has published a range of helpful ideas on their website.  Modifications will be easier and cheaper to carry out in some properties than others.

Sometimes, modifying a home sufficiently may not be feasible. And sometimes the particular impairments experienced by a person with dementia may make living in their home (even with modifications) unsuitable.

And here’s where life can get difficult. Even many retirement properties have not been designed, decorated or equipped with dementia in mind. Residential care may become the best, or in some cases, the only viable option. But even here there can be problems if the home is not set up to cater for dementia residents.

The Dementia Friendly Care Home

The environment within the care home is critical. Without careful thought and adaptation, a care home could become a bewildering and unsettling place to live, particularly for a new resident who has to get used to new surroundings, people and routines.

The interior decor makes a huge difference in making the living space calming and manageable. Avoiding busy patterns will make the environment easier to deal with and colour contrasts can be used to help residents easily find their way to the toilet or their bedroom. Additionally, memory triggers and familiar images from a relevant era help residents feel more at home and relaxed and can help with navigation.

Sherborne House specialises in care for people with dementia. We’ve specifically designed and decorated the interior to ensure that our residents with dementia feel at ease and supported, and able to live as independently as possible. To find out more, contact us today on 01305 206 140.

Planning for the future

As we age, we understand that our needs are going to change and our circumstances will change with this but when it comes to that time, the emotional impact of all these changes can hugely affect our outlook, personality and health. Many individuals will experience the downsizing of space and boxes – after living in a good sized family home, which is then reduced to a small bungalow or flat and then downsized again to fit within a room in a care home. This can be difficult to deal with; changing your environment, in some cases sharing your environment for the first time and accepting that you now need assistance.

So when it comes to choosing the right care home or nursing home it is likely to be a very difficult decision.

What to consider when choosing a care home?

There are many things to consider, ask and check when looking into care homes. Everybody will have different priorities, but some considerations are likely to include:

• The type of care required for your loved one, can it be provided at this care home?
• The cost of the care home?
• Does the home offer stimulating activities and common living areas for social interaction?
• Can all your food and dietary requirements be met?
• Is there enough room to make the space your own, with possessions?
• Do you have easy access to services, such as GP’s, hairdressers, opticians etc?

How can the transition to a care home be eased?

Having a mixture of homely private space, spacious shared environments and the escape of outside facilities will provide the options of finding a space that suits an individual best – making this transition easier. Some will be excited by the prospect of sharing environments with others and having new company, others will find this initially overwhelming, craving private space instead.

Staff within any home should encourage all residents to continue living and enjoying life in their new home, whether that is keeping up a hobby, socialising with other residents, or keeping active with a range of activities and events. The more ‘normal’ the home can feel, the easier the transition is, leading to more relaxed residents.

The person-centred approach

At Altogether Care we see the person first not the age. We call it ‘person-centered care’. Our range of care options are based around best fitting your needs, to encourage you to continue living the life you love, just with the assistance you now need.

With this in mind, we have recently completed a major refurbishment and extension to Sherborne House. This brand new extension wing offers nursing care alongside the current Dementia care that we already offer at Sherborne House. This home features spacious living areas and access to landscaped gardens to enhance resident’s facilities inside and out.  To find out more about Sherborne House visit our website, or for more information on how to reserve a room within the new wing opening on May 1st contact us on 01935 423210.

Understanding Dementia Care

Understanding how to care and support a person suffering from Dementia can be a challenge. Dementia is the umbrella term for a wide range of symptoms linked with the decline of memory to a level which then affects a person’s ability to independently function as they once did. The most common form of Dementia is Alzheimer’s Disease but there are also many other forms of dementia which are less common but display similar symptoms and will have similar effects upon the person suffering.

Living with dementia can have a big emotional, social, psychological and practical impact on a person especially as the disease develops. Forgetting short term memories and finding themselves very confused can upset, frustrate and anger someone suffering. In some cases their long term memories will be their strongest and nostalgic environments, pictures and music can be the triggers to open them up.

As the disease develops and the person begins to forget more this can affect:

• Personality
• Confidence
• Social ability
• Independent abilities and skills – at the beginning this could include driving and cooking but as the disease is progressive can develop to feeding themselves and controlling bodily functions

Despite the biggest impact being on the person suffering from this disease, their carer’s, family and friends will also face a huge challenge adapting to support and care. This video portrays one man’s struggles coming to terms with how his wife has changed from suffering with Alzheimer’s Disease. Often families wish to keep their loved one at home for as long as possible, in familiar surroundings, where they can care for them. But as a progressive disease it often comes to a point where professional care is required in the form of a specialist care home.

It can be difficult to choose which care home will be most beneficial to your loved ones care needs. Altogether Care’s specialist dementia care home is Sherborne House. Person-centred care is principle in our philosophy, believing that those living with Dementia who are well supported by a professional team giving them their time and energy are more likely to lead fulfilling lives for longer. Sherborne House has been furnished and decorated with Dementia in mind, incorporating sensory touches and memory triggers that research has shown really benefits the cognitive process. Clinical care is supported with a healthy diet, using fresh ingredients and menus to suit all tastes and requirements and at times we will also call upon various alternative therapies such as; physiotherapy, reflexology Reiki and aroma-therapy to complement clients care needs.

We understand how difficult it can be to entrust a care home with a loved one who you have watched suffer from the changes of Dementia which is why we offer you to spend the day with us to really get a feel for our homes.

To find out more about the tailored care that we can offer you, get in touch 01305 300 161.

Yeovil Care Home is a finalist

Sherborne House Care Home in Yeovil reached the finals of the Care Awards 2016 which was organised by Care Focus (South West).  An awards evening took place on 22nd April in Taunton with a total of twelve separate awards for those employed in the care sector. Sherborne House employs forty two staff and was short-listed for the Outstanding Care team Award.

Caroline Sharp, Manager at Sherborne House said, ‘Although we didn’t win we were delighted to be nominated and attend the event. My staff always work hard in everything that they do and they are all winners every day’.  Sherborne House specialises in Dementia Care and is part of the Altogether Care Group.

Ben McGrail from BBC Somerset hosted the awards evening and presented each category  winner with flowers.  Guests enjoyed a three course meal and a disco.

For more information please contact Ellie Phillips PR on 07834 752200

Taking a fresh approach

As we live longer the question of how we will cope with the challenges of old age is becoming more and more pertinent to an ever increasing number of people in Britain.

Across Dorset and South Somerset, Altogether Care a leading provider of age related care is taking a fresh approach.

Offering a range of residential, nursing centres and community based Care at Home services reaching from Bournemouth to Yeovil, this family run organisation puts emphasis on recognising that as individuals we are all different and there should be no one size fits all approach to care and support.

Altogether Care is able to offer a broad range of outcome based care that is firmly focused and tailored to each person as an individual.

Altogether Care supports and enables individuals to be active participants in their support rather than simply passive recipients of care. For most people maintaining independence is of huge importance and Altogether Care’s flexible care routes are designed to support this.

Offering an integrated care pathway, from regular home visits which are fundamental in reducing social isolation for those who need a relatively low level of support and monitoring, progressing then to live-in care options for those who may be more dependent but very much want to stay at home, to specialist residential, nursing and dementia care for those who may ultimately need a higher level of support. In addition, Altogether Care is a well regarded provider of palliative and end of life care.

Prominent in Altogether Care’s portfolio of services are Sherborne House in Yeovil a specialist dementia and high dependency service, Weymouth Care Home providing residential and nursing services and Steepleton Manor.

Steepleton Manor must be almost unique in so far as this service it is able to offer; residential, nursing and end of life care in the setting of a late Victorian Manor house, in the idyllic Dorset countryside of Thomas Hardy.

Wherever the setting Altogether Care’s commitment is to delivering high quality care based on not only what is important for an individual but also what is important to an individual.

Some recent day to day activities